The american midwest essays on regional history

His kidnapping started the longest war in American history, and both sides the Apaches and the white invaders blamed him for it. A mixed-blood warrior who moved uneasily between the worlds of the Apaches and the American soldiers, he was never trusted by either but desperately needed by both. He was the only man Geronimo ever feared.

The american midwest essays on regional history

Middle Passage Before the Atlantic slave The american midwest essays on regional history there were already people of African descent in America.

A few countries in Africa would buy, sell, and trade other enslaved Africans, who were often prisoners of war, with the Europeans. The people of Mali and Benin are known for partaking in the event of selling their prisoners of war and other unwanted people off as slaves.

On the ships, the slaves were separated from their family long before they boarded the ships. Male slaves were generally kept in the ship's hold, where they experienced the worst of crowding. The women on the ships often endured rape by the crewmen. This gave crewmen easy access to the women which was often regarded as one of the perks of the trade system.

Male slaves were the most likely candidates to mutiny and only at times they were on deck.

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In order for the crew members to keep the slaves under control and prevent future rebellions, the crews were often twice as large and members would instill fear into the slaves through brutality and harsh punishments. The English settlers treated these captives as indentured servants and released them after a number of years.

This practice was gradually replaced by the system of race-based slavery used in the Caribbean. Additionally, released servants had to be replaced. Massachusetts was the first colony to legalize slavery in Other colonies followed suit by passing laws that passed slavery on to the children of slaves and making non-Christian imported servants slaves for life.

In all, about 10—12 million Africans were transported to the Western Hemisphere. The vast majority of these people came from that stretch of the West African coast extending from present-day Senegal to Angola; a small percentage came from Madagascar and East Africa.

The vast majority went to the West Indies and Brazil, where they died quickly.

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Demographic conditions were highly favorable in the American colonies, with less disease, more food, some medical care, and lighter work loads than prevailed in the sugar fields.

They avoided the plantations. With the vast amount of good land and the shortage of laborers, plantation owners turned to lifetime slaves who worked for their keep but were not paid wages and could not easily escape. Slaves had some legal rights it was a crime to kill a slave, and a few whites were hanged for it.

Generally the slaves developed their own family system, religion and customs in the slave quarters with little interference from owners, who were only interested in work outputs. Before the s, the North American mainland colonies were expanding, but still fairly small in size and did not have a great demand for labour, so the colonists did not import large numbers of African slaves at this point.

Some had been shipped directly from Africa most of them were from sbut initially, very often they had been shipped via the West Indies in small cargoes after spending time working on the islands.

Their legal status was now clear: As white settlers began to claim and clear more land for large-scale farming and plantations, the number of slaves imported directly from Africa began to rapidly increase between the s into the s and onward, since the trade in slaves coming in from the West Indies was much too small to meet the huge demand for the now fast-growing North-American mainland slave market.

Additionally, most American slave-buyers no longer wanted slaves coming in from the West Indies - by now they were either harder to obtain, too expensive, undesirable, or more often, ruined in many ways by the very brutal regime of the island sugar plantations.

By the end of the seventeenth century, a relaxation of colonial tax laws, and the British Crown's removal of monopolies that had been granted to a very small number of British slave-traders like the Royal African Company, had made the direct slave trade with Africa much easier.

As a result, freshly imported, young, and healthy Africans were now much more affordable, cheaper in price, and more readily available in large numbers to American slave buyers, who by now preferred to purchase them, even if it took some time for them to adjust to a new life as plantation slaves.

From about tothe majority of slaves imported to the North American mainland came directly from Africa in huge cargoes to fill the massive spike in demand for much-needed labour to work the continually expanding plantations in the Southern colonies later to be stateswith most heading to Virginia, South Carolina, and French or Spanish Louisiana.

However, big Northern cities like New York, Philadelphia, and Boston, had relatively large black populations slave or free for most of the colonial period and thereafter.

From the s, American-born slaves of African descent already began to outnumber African-born slaves. By the time of the American Revolution, a few of the Northern states had begun to consider abolishing and slavery, and some Southern states like Virginia had produced such large and self-sustaining locally-born slave populations by natural increase, that they stopped taking in, direct imports of slaves from Africa altogether but still kept slavery, which continued in the South.

However, other Southern states like Georgia and South Carolina still relied on constant, fresh supplies of slave labour to keep up with the demand of their burgeoning plantation economies, so they continued to allow the direct importation of slaves from Africa right up toonly stopping for a few years in the s, because of a temporary lull in the trade brought on by the American Revolutionary War.

The continued, direct importation of slaves from Africa ensured that for most of the eighteenth century, South Carolina's black population remained very high, with blacks outnumbering whites three to one, unlike in Virginia, which had a white majority, despite its large black slave population.

All legal, direct importation of slaves from Africa had stopped bywhen the now, newly formed United States finally banned its citizens from participating in the international slave trade altogether by law. Despite the ban, small to moderate cargoes of slaves were occasionally being illegally shipped into the United States directly from Africa for many years, as late as Slaves in the cities and towns had many more privileges, but the great majority of slaves lived on southern tobacco or rice plantations, usually in groups of 20 or more.

The colony had about 56, slaves, who outnumbered whites 2: About slaves rose up, and seizing guns and ammunition, murdered twenty whites, and headed for Spanish Florida. The local militia soon intercepted and killed most of them.

The american midwest essays on regional history

In the midst of cries for relief from British rule, people pointed out the apparent hypocrisies of slave holders' demanding freedom.The Midwestern United States (or Midwest) is a name for the north-central states of the United States of America.

The states that are part of the Midwest are: The American Midwest: Essays on Regional History. () Frederick; John T. ed. Out of the Midwest: A Collection of Present-Day Writing () literary excerpts;.

The Identity of the American Midwest: Essays on Regional History (Midwestern History and Culture) and a great selection of similar Used, New and Collectible Books available now at heartoftexashop.com The American Midwest: Essays in Regional History by Andrew R L Cayton, Andrew Clayton "Many would say that ordinariness is the Midwest's 'historic burden.' A writer living in Dayton, Ohio recently suggested that dullness is a Midwestern trait.

Review of: The American Midwest: Essays on Regional History. Cayton, Andrew R. L. and Gray, Susan E., ed. The American Midwest: Essays on Regional History.

Edited by Andrew R. L. Cayton and Susan E. Gray. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, Pp. vii, Maps. $) Is midwestern regionality a viable analytical construct for historians to employ?

The editors and contributors to this volume. - The Journal of American History In a series of often highly personal essays, the authors—all of whom are experts on various aspects of Midwestern history—consider the question of regional identity as a useful way of thinking .

MBR: Library Bookwatch, May